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Revise Your Poetry!

Revise Your Poetry!

The first completed draft of your poem is only the beginning. Poets often go through several drafts of a poem before considering the work “done.”

To revise:

Put your poem away for a few days, and then come back to it. When you re-read it, does anything seem confusing? Hard to follow? Do you see anything that needs improvement that you overlooked the first time?

Often, when you are in the act of writing, you may leave out important details because you are so familiar with the topic. Re-reading a poem helps you to see it from the “outsider’s perspective” of a reader.

Show your poem to others and ask for criticism. Don’t be content with a response like, “That’s a nice poem.” You won’t learn anything from that kind of response. Instead, find people who will tell you specific things you need to improve in your poem.

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greenHow is originality fostered?

1. By personal difficulties, particularly in childhood, that have been worked through. Analyse and meet these difficulties.

2. By unswerving self-honesty. Ask yourself: is this what you really hoped to write? Could you not dig deeper into the wellsprings of the poem?

3. By starting afresh, expanding your repertoire with new techniques and new themes.

4. By pacing yourselves, drawing up timetables of writing that extend and build on previous accomplishments.

5. By working in related fields: writing novels, short-stories, articles: particularly where these unlock new perspectives and energies.

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j0439466[1]Vocabularies not only reflect interests and fashions, but must be broadly effective in a contemporary setting.

1. That is the argument against poeticisms and out-of date words like thee, ’tis, maiden.

2. Words never possess wholly transparent meanings, but in the more affective poetry their latent associations, multiple meanings, textural suggestions and rhythmic power are naturally given freer rein.

3. The touchstone is always the intended audience. “Word too familiar, or too remote, defeat the purpose of a poet,” said Johnson, and that observation remains true, as much for traditionalists writing inside a poetic tradition as for others trying to kindle poetry out of naked experience.

4. Place your poems alongside others in magazines or anthologies in which you’d like to be included. If they don’t fit, one reason may be your word choice.

5. Perform your poems in workshops and readings. Pay attention to the reception and to comments afterwards.

6. If in doubt, err on the side of everyday usage, even if it means spoiling the odd line.

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A poem from our guest mark Russell:

My World

My world falls apart.
All I remember is love…
How can I survive?
I try to create a way.
It all seems to be in vain…

Structured poetry is new to me but I feel i must try.

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Bottled Up Sentiments Blog
Bottled Up Sentiments

I would like to welcome Bottled Up Sentiments, our latest blog addition to our growing contributors.  Click on the image to visit this beautifully designed blog!

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Visit Bruce's Blog

Bruce Dobson

 

I would like to welcome Bruce Dobson to our group.  Bruce posts his poetry on his own blog.  Click on the image to visit his blog.  His blog is also listed on our Links Page under Poetry Blogs.

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It’s hard to find a wide audience that will provide writers of poetry good insights and appreciation for their work.

That’s why I recommend getting yourself and your work out there by joining some good quality social networks and/or poetry sites.

Goodreads is a great place to showcase your publications and to make friends with similar interests. Another great place is Facebook. Facebook is better than Twitter because you can join some very large poetry groups that not only share poetry, but friendships as well.

Just a few ideas from your friends in poetry. Keep writing!

Posted via m.livejournal.com.

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