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j0439466[1]Vocabularies not only reflect interests and fashions, but must be broadly effective in a contemporary setting.

1. That is the argument against poeticisms and out-of date words like thee, ’tis, maiden.

2. Words never possess wholly transparent meanings, but in the more affective poetry their latent associations, multiple meanings, textural suggestions and rhythmic power are naturally given freer rein.

3. The touchstone is always the intended audience. “Word too familiar, or too remote, defeat the purpose of a poet,” said Johnson, and that observation remains true, as much for traditionalists writing inside a poetic tradition as for others trying to kindle poetry out of naked experience.

4. Place your poems alongside others in magazines or anthologies in which you’d like to be included. If they don’t fit, one reason may be your word choice.

5. Perform your poems in workshops and readings. Pay attention to the reception and to comments afterwards.

6. If in doubt, err on the side of everyday usage, even if it means spoiling the odd line.

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Bottled Up Sentiments Blog
Bottled Up Sentiments

I would like to welcome Bottled Up Sentiments, our latest blog addition to our growing contributors.  Click on the image to visit this beautifully designed blog!

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Visit Bruce's Blog

Bruce Dobson

 

I would like to welcome Bruce Dobson to our group.  Bruce posts his poetry on his own blog.  Click on the image to visit his blog.  His blog is also listed on our Links Page under Poetry Blogs.

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In view of the Haikus popularity in the West, it’s surprising that the Than Bauk is not more popular. It consists of three lines of four syllables that should be witty. The nickname for this form of poetry, could be “Stairway”, because of the rhyme steps through the poem. This is the basic rhyme scheme:

O. O.
O. a
O. O. a. O
O. a. O. b

You can see from this that it forms a descending step, and at this point it can be terminated. You have twelve syllables to work with, and it could be very hard work. It could be much easier if a longer poem were made. If this is the case, then the practice is that the last syllable of the third line starts the next descent as shown
below:

O. O. O. a
O. O. a. O
O. a. O. b
O. O. b. O
O. b.
O. c
O. O. c. O
O. c. O. d. etc.

FTRA
(Freight Train
Riders of America)

Down by the rails
soup in pails, hot
train
wails, main line
life is fine, see
cheap wine, the world
in a whirl:
life
unfurled bedroll
place with soul. Sleep
the goal: seek
life
options rife call
your strife constricts
but it picks us
and
sticks on you
confined blues mode
he rues mundane
on this plane
tied
life’s pain to vent
the rails went off
and sent away
boxcars
sway free
no pay to stay
FTRA

(Dana Rowe)

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